Biological Hazards in the Home for Remote Workers

As Canadians continue to spend increased amounts of time at home in light of COVID-19, keeping a clean and safe at-home work environment is more important than ever. Keep in mind that some of the most dangerous hazards are not obvious and may be difficult to see. This article will identify the biological hazards that could be present in your home. It will also suggest techniques to eliminate these risks and preserve your safety while working from home.  Continue Reading…

Workplace Hazards Series: COVID-19

As governments ease months-long restrictions allowing employees to return to their offices, the new reality is that these places won’t be the same as we left them. The new normal will entail increasingly structured workplaces that are more mindful of potential physical contamination. For the foreseeable future, there will be new routines and procedures that we will need to enforce and become accustomed to, seemingly normal ways of doing things that need to be shifted in order to protect team members from potential infection of the notorious virus.   Continue Reading…

Don’t slip-up at work and not use fall detection

A misstep on a ladder at an oil site. A trip while getting off the tractor. Or, a simple slip on a small chemical spill. All of these common occurrences can lead to injuries that not only make you unable to work but could lead to a visit to the local emergency room. 

Did you know that in a 2018 report from the Canadian Institute for Health Information, researchers found that in 2016 and 2017, there were more than 650, 000 visits to emergency departments because of injuries from falls with many occurring in the workplace? And according to Stats Canada, the most common type of workplace injury is…you guessed it – falls. In this blog article, we cover fall detection devices and Continue Reading…

Lone Worker Risks in the Canadian Forestry Sector

When it comes to our Canadian economy, the forestry industry provides a substantial source of wealth for the country. Our forestry trade balance (the difference between what we import and what we export to international partners) accounts for $19.8 billion of Canada’s GDP, according to the Government of Canada. This is equivalent to about 2% and represents the most substantial forest product trade balance in the world. We have held this position for years, and the gap between Canada and Sweden (the second-largest net trader) has been Continue Reading…

A Spotlight on Safety in the Entertainment Industry

Entertainment Industry - SafetyLine Lone Worker

The Local Entertainment Industry 

Vancouver’s entertainment industry saw over 450 productions last year and generated close to $3.4 billion for the local economy. This figure represents a considerable increase from $2.3 billion in 2017. Furthermore, the industry provided jobs for over 60,000 people. BC’s film industry is home to more than 200 producers and over 250 businesses that primarily cater to motion picture production. Prem Gill, CEO of Creative BC, stated that film companies within BC are “delivering the world’s highest quality content” thanks to world-class talent, industry-leading skills, and substantial infrastructure. Continue Reading…

2020 Goal Settings: How Your Organization can best Protect Lone Workers

The statistics regarding workplace injuries and fatalities in Canada are baffling. According to the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety, there were 951 workplace fatalities recorded in 2017 with an additional 251,508 injuries which took place on the job. An employer must manage the safety and health of his or her employees and thus minimize the number of incidents that occur in the workplace. Continue Reading…

The Hazards of H2S Gas

What is H2S Gas?

H2S gas is a chemical compound that stands for hydrogen sulfide carbonyl sulfide gas. It is a colorless gas and is commonly recognized by its distinct rotten egg smell. H2S gas is also widely referred to as sewer gas, sour gas, stink damp, or hydrosulphuric acid. H2S is extremely poisonous to humans, corrosive, and very flammable. When it burns, H2S emits another deadly gas: sulfur dioxide, which has similar symptoms and outcomes to H2S exposure. Unfortunately, year after year workers is incidentally exposed to H2S, many of who Continue Reading…

Are Health and Community Care workers classified as Lone Workers?

Are Health Care workers classified as Lone Workers

A person is considered to be alone at work when they are on their own and cannot be seen or heard by another person. Careful consideration of all situations where this may be the case is essential. Working alone encompasses all employees who may go for a period of time, short or long, where they do not have any direct contact with a co-worker. Even though working alone is not always dangerous, it can be when other factors come into play. Continue Reading…

Essential Safety Tips for Working at Heights

working at height with safetyline lone worker

The prospect of working at heights covers many different industries. Whilst some professions have bigger risk than others, it’s important to be safe no matter what kind of height you might be facing. Taking precautions before working at height can save lives and prevent serious and life-threatening injuries, so being prepared in your line of work is incredibly important.  

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6 Ways to Prevent Electrical Accidents When Working Alone

Does your job entail you to work with electrical equipment? Then you would understand the importance of practicing electrical safety. When you are working alone, you have to be extra careful so that you don’t find yourself in an electrical emergency. Here are 6 things to follow for electrical safety if you are working alone.


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